Wednesday, March 6, 2013

Chapter 5: Arson

A person who commits this crime is called an arsonist. Many arsonists use accelerants, such as gasoline or kerosene to get a fire going.
  • Chapter 5: Arson
This chapter deals with arson. It has only one section, §81, which defines arson, attempted arson, or conspiracy to commit arson, and provides a penalty of imprisonment for up to 25 years, the greater of the fine under this title or the cost of repairing or replacing any property that is damaged or destroyed, or both. It also provides that if the building is a dwelling or if the life of any person is placed in jeopardy, the penalty shall be a fine under this title, imprisonment for "any term of years or for life", or both.
  • Chapter 7: Assault
This chapter deals with assault. §111 prohibits "assaulting, resisting, or impeding" officers,employees and Law Enforcement Explorers of the United States while engaged in or on account of the performance of official duties, and the assault or intimidation of "any person who formerly served" as an officers or employees of the United States "on account of the performance of official duties during such person's term of service". The section provides for a penalty for simple assault of a fine, imprisonment for up to one year, or both, and a penalty in all other cases of a fine, imprisonment for up to eight years, or both. An enhanced penalty of a fine or imprisonment for up to 20 years is provided for if a "deadly or dangerous weapon" is used or if bodily injury is inflicted.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Obstruction_of_justice

http://uscode.house.gov/download/pls/18C11A.txt

http://www.law.cornell.edu/wex/constructive_fraud

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Witness_tampering


18 USC § 1001 - Statements or entries generally

http://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/1001
(a) Except as otherwise provided in this section, whoever, in any matter within the jurisdiction of the executive, legislative, or judicial branch of the Government of the United States, knowingly and willfully—
(1) falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;
(2) makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or
(3) makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry;

United States

In U.S. law, a "false statement" generally refers to United States federal false statements statute, contained in 18 U.S.C. § 1001. Most commonly, prosecutors use this statute to reach cover-up crimes such as perjury, false declarations, and obstruction of justice and government fraud cases.[1] Its earliest progenitor was the False Claims Act of 1863,[2] and in 1934 therequirement of an intent to defraud was eliminated to enforce the National Industrial Recovery Act of 1933 (NIRA) against producers of "hot oil", oil produced in violation of production restrictions established pursuant to the NIRA.[3]
The statute criminalizes a government official who "knowingly and willfully":[4]
(1) falsifies, conceals, or covers up by any trick, scheme, or device a material fact;
(2) makes any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or representation; or
(3) makes or uses any false writing or document knowing the same to contain any materially false, fictitious, or fraudulent statement or entry.

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